As we move further and further away from the decade that was the War on Terror it becomes easier to view the madness as an aberration, and harder to view the surveillance state legacy as something normal. Personally, this difficulty is compounded by my experience of being a 20-something in the golden decade of freedom that followed the end of the Cold War and the long peace it delivered for most.

Incendiary is set at the edge of our current surveillance state, with a terrorist bombing profoundly effecting change in the life of our highly nervous protagonist. The cascade of events comes fast, and sweeps up the characters in a colossal and irresistible wave of action and reaction.

What I liked most about the novel was the incredible likability of the main character, and, in fact the characters in general. The people are in equal measures both human and unbelievably inhumane, a bizarre mishmash of the profoundly beautiful and intensely ugly condensed almost effortlessly.  You find yourself both understanding and despising some characters in equal measure, and all are inclined to work their way under your skin.

Recommended for: any occasion. Light enough to read on a plane, but deep enough to compel you to switch off the idiot box and read instead.

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