September 2013


As we move further and further away from the decade that was the War on Terror it becomes easier to view the madness as an aberration, and harder to view the surveillance state legacy as something normal. Personally, this difficulty is compounded by my experience of being a 20-something in the golden decade of freedom that followed the end of the Cold War and the long peace it delivered for most.

Incendiary is set at the edge of our current surveillance state, with a terrorist bombing profoundly effecting change in the life of our highly nervous protagonist. The cascade of events comes fast, and sweeps up the characters in a colossal and irresistible wave of action and reaction.

What I liked most about the novel was the incredible likability of the main character, and, in fact the characters in general. The people are in equal measures both human and unbelievably inhumane, a bizarre mishmash of the profoundly beautiful and intensely ugly condensed almost effortlessly.  You find yourself both understanding and despising some characters in equal measure, and all are inclined to work their way under your skin.

Recommended for: any occasion. Light enough to read on a plane, but deep enough to compel you to switch off the idiot box and read instead.

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Ganymede is apparently the fourth book in a series, and I think I may have made a mistake reading it. While on the whole Cherie writes very well, this novel reads like an appendix to whatever books came before it.

The story revolves around New Orleans and two characters apparently drawn from the Priest’s earlier novels. They need to rescue a new bit of tech, a ‘submarine’, from the evil clutches of the Texan army and deliver it to the Union, thereby potentially ending the war. But! Before this can happen there are zombies to battle, sneakiness to be sneaked, and some of the most disjointed action you’ve ever read to tackle.

As I say, Priest writes well. I connected with the characters almost immediately, and bought into the altiverse she proposes. But the plot and story itself are disconnected, haphazard, and most probably churned out by an author who has moved into the “words per day per hour and let’s make money” stage of their career. I think that if she’s taken time to read back over what she’d written, and perhaps actually turn it into a coherent narrative, this might actually have been a great read, instead of an OK one.

Recommended for: Airports.

I think we’ll all need to agree that steampunk is now approaching its use-by date. I’m not meaning this in  spiteful way, more that steampunk has settled into that comfortable middle-age of genres – there are still just enough newbies out there who don’t think it’s old hat yet, but in itself it’s widening around the middle and becoming all-too-predictable.

So let’s compare it to true sci-fi. Back in the 1950s science fiction was brand-spanking new. It was crazy aliens, rockets, flying cars and keen-as-beans astronauts. Today it’s pretty much settled into a series of familiar tropes. Things like warp drives and hyperdrives, giant spaceships and wars with unknown powers. The genre is driven best by people who understand things tech, and 9 times out of 10 you’ll be getting the same old space opera with inter-changeable characters and predictable narrative.

And there we say welcome to The Falling Machine. While Meyer writes well, this is pretty familiar stuff with ever-so-slight twists on steampunk canon. I’d recommend it for reading on a holiday, or perhaps on the bus.